Tag Archives: CCSSO

Carnegie Corporation: From Philanthropy to Frightening Control to Common Core


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By Danette Clark

In the trailer for the upcoming Common Core documentary, Building the Machine, Political Scientist Dr. Andrew Hacker refers to the little man behind the curtain in The Wizard of Oz when suggesting that, with regard to Common Core, we don’t know who’s pulling all the strings.

Well, we know there are lots of little men (of little character) with big corporate interests behind Common Core. We also know Bill Gates and the Obama administration have thrown their full weight into the initiative.

Of course, Common Core is the concerted effort of many — after all, 45 states signed on before the standards were even written — but it does appear that Carnegie is the one great and powerful force working all the controls from behind the curtain.

From the creation of high school academic credits and the College-Level Entrance Examination Program, to federal Pell grants and the establishment of the largest testing organization in the world (ETS), Carnegie Corporation and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (hereafter “Carnegie” or “the foundations”) have made important and historic contributions to America’s education system.

With each contribution, however, has come increasing influence and power. Likewise, with each passing decade and sitting Carnegie president, the foundations’ objectives for use of that power have changed dramatically.

For example, according to Carnegie.org, former Carnegie Corporation president, John W. Gardner, led the foundation into an “era of strategic philanthropy — the planned, organized, deliberately constructed means to attain stated ends.” From Gardner, “…the Foundation inherited a commitment to… moral leadership as a key feature of a democratic society, and thus of its educational systems”.

As a psychologist, Gardner believed in the merging of education and behavioral science to address world problems and create social change.

Gardner also opened the door to federal intrusion and control by inviting the federal government in to collaborate with Carnegie on the implementation of new education initiatives.

David Hamburg, Carnegie president from 1982 to 1997, further expounded on the foundations’ work of diffusing social science and education research “to improve social policy and practice”. To that end, Hamburg forged partnerships with leading institutions that, according to Carnegie.org, “had the capability to influence public thought and action”.

During this time, other partnerships were formed as well, with anti-capitalists and communists, also bent on using education to engineer a new social order.

Although Carnegie now claims to support and promote best practices in education, it has long supported one reform over all others –the Annenberg Institute’s Coalition of Essential Schools — the same progressive, indoctrinating, whole-child reform supported by President Obama for more than twenty years.

In fact, the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) movement has become such an integral part of the work of Carnegie Corporation and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, that it could easily be argued that the three are now synonymous.

This is important for those opposed to Common Core to realize and learn from, because while we were sleeping, the most influential ‘philanthropic’ organization in the country gave birth to an exceedingly politically radical education initiative, drove its expansion for three decades, and now carries it forward into the creation of Common Core.

Carnegie Brings Anti-Capitalists and Would-Be Common Core Creators Together

In 1981, Carnegie donated seed money to CES founder, Ted Sizer, for the research project that led him to start the Coalition of Essential Schools.

As explained here, the late Ted Sizer was a humanist who preached that schools must shape children morally and politically in order to create a more just world.

Co-founder of CES schools, Deborah Meier, is a Marxist-socialist and a long time friend and associate of Bill Ayers, Mike Klonsky, and other anti-American educators.

Just a year after CES was officially established at Brown University, Carnegie created the Carnegie Forum on Education and the Economy (now known as the National Center on Education and the Economy).

The Forum, led by Marc Tucker, commissioned a Task Force on Teaching as a Profession to address the need to “fundamentally change the nature of the education system to take advantage of a professionalized teaching force and to base that new system on higher standards for both students and teachers”.

The Task Force was led by James B. Hunt and its members included former Carnegie President John W. Gardner, American Federation of Teachers President Albert Shanker, Vice-President of IBM Lewis Branscomb, and Coalition of Essential Schools Co-Founder Deborah Meier.

Remember, James Hunt and IBM President, Louis Gerstner would later come together to form Achieve, Inc., the organization charged with writing the Common Core State Standards. Hunt’s organization, the Hunt Institute, is part of the joint effort of NGA, CCSSO, and Achieve in creating Common Core.

Under Tucker’s direction, the Carnegie Task Force wrote and published a report titled, A Nation Prepared: Teachers for the 21st Century, which called for and led to the creation of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, of which Tucker, Meier, and Hunt served as founding board members.

In 1987, with the help of Carnegie Corporation, Marc Tucker went on to establish the National Center on Education and the Economy (NCEE) as an independent institution that would continue the work of the Carnegie Forum.

Damning enough on its own (but we’ll explore further nonetheless) is the fact that NCEE’s Vice President Judy Codding was one of four charter principals who participated in the creation of Sizer’s Coalition of Essential Schools. According to CES, Codding led two early Essential School efforts in New York and later greatly contributed to the expansion of “Coalition ideas” in California.

According to NCEE’s website, …”in 1991, NCEE invited the University of Pittsburgh, 23 states, 6 cities and three national foundations to join with it in creating New Standards, a collaborative committed to… student performance standards and matching assessments to launch the standards movement in the United States”.

This initiative, which later came to be known as the New Standards Project, was cited at the 1996 National Education Summit (that gave birth to Achieve) to outline the “qualities of a world-class education standards system”.

From its start, the NCEE New Standards Project has been led by CES reformers,  including Annenberg’s current and long-time Executive Director, Warren Simmons.

As admitted by NCEE, “many of the leaders in the New Standards work went on to play leading roles in the development of the Common Core State Standards, which built in part on the foundation laid by (The) New Standards (Project)”.

In other words, Common Core was, in fact, built on the foundation laid by Carnegie and the Coalition of Essential Schools.

ANNENBERG AND GATES FOUNDATION MONEY SPENT THE WAY CARNEGIE SEES FIT

With the Carnegie-created NCEE working in nearly two dozen states to lay the foundation for a new national standard, Carnegie began focusing its efforts on infiltrating additional districts and states.

Just before becoming president of Carnegie Corporation in 1997, Vartan Gregorian served as director of the Annenberg Institute for School Reform where he led in the selection and distribution of Annenberg Challenge grants used to implement CES reform in various school districts across the country, including Chicago where an Annenberg Challenge site was led by communist Bill Ayers and Barack Obama.

While the Annenberg Institute admits that each group chosen to receive grants had to meet “unique conditions” and that “independent, non-profit entities” were “specially created” to run each Annenberg Challenge site, it was not made known that several of those ‘independent entities’ were specially created by Carnegie. Yet another blow to the “Common Core is state-led” claim; even the early roots of Common Core weren’t state-led.

In Chicago, for example, it was reported that three of the largest independent education foundations came together in support of and lobbied for the approval of the Annenberg grant proposal submitted by the Bill Ayers consortium. However, it was not reported that the presidents of two of those so-called ‘independent education foundations’, namely Adele Simmons of the Mac Arthur Foundation, and Patricia Graham of the Spencer Foundation, were from Carnegie.

Patricia Graham, whom Obama himself (in an attempt to diminish the influence of Bill Ayers) later credited with choosing him to chair the Chicago Annenberg Challenge, was an advisor to Carnegie Corporation and had recently served as chair of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

In Pennsylvania, it was the Philadelphia Education Fund (PEF) that was ‘chosen’ to receive an Annenberg grant. PEF’s executive director was Warren Simmons, now director of the Annenberg Institute. Just prior to that, Simmons co-directed the Carnegie/NCEE New Standards Project.

Carnegie’s control also appears to extend to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which has reportedly invested more than $2 billion in Common Core.

The same year Gregorian become president of Carnegie Corporation, he met with and convinced Bill Gates to form the Gates Learning Foundation (now the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation), to which Gregorian was appointed as one of only six directors.

With the title of advisor to the Annenberg Foundation under his belt, and now, holding great power over both the Gates and Carnegie foundations, Gregorian began meeting with leaders of other top organizations across the country to discuss ways to combine their grant making efforts.

From inception through today, the education arm of the Gates Foundation has been led by Annenberg/CES reformers, likely all placed there under the direction of Gregorian.

Current director of the Gates Foundation’s College Ready in the United States Program, Vicki Phillips, was Executive Director of the Annenberg Challenge at Greater Philadelphia First.

Up Next – Biased Science Standards and Mandated Curriculum

Achieve, Inc. and Carnegie led in the creation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) that were released last year.

These standards came to be in the same way as Common Core’s English and Math standards — the almighty Carnegie said it shall be done, gathered its favorite progressives together to complete the task, provided the funding, and had its partner, the US Department of Education, throw its weight behind it.

Not surprising, NGSS teaches the Big Bang Theory and evolution as fact, with no reference to creationism. Man-made global warming is also a fact in these standards and students are required to explore solutions to the warming crisis.

While this document doesn’t specifically state whether Carnegie “launched” or simply “advanced” CCSSO and NGA, both organizations, by way of Carnegie funding alone, are certainly subject to Carnegie control.

CCSSO, which also receives federal funding, has been in Carnegie’s pocket for decades. In 1987, while Carnegie’s Task Force on Teaching (CES co-founder Deborah Meier, James Hunt, etc.) were busy establishing the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, another leader in CES reform, Common Core’s Linda Darling-Hammond, was gearing up to lead the drafting committee of CCSSO’s newly formed Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC).

INTASC, founded with Carnegie dollars, of course, was created to develop standards “compatible with the advanced certification standards of the new National Board for Professional Teaching Standards”.

The most recent version of INTASC’s Model Core Teaching Standards were specifically revised to align with the Common Core State Standards.

With student and teacher standards complete, Carnegie’s focus as of late has been on professional development and the creation of Common Core lessons, texts, and assessments.

So what’s next? Will Carnegie and its bestie, the US Department of Education, secure their hard work and vested billions by mandating specific Common Core content?

Even before Common Core was implemented in most states, there was a Call for Common Content issued by the Albert Shanker Institute, proclaiming that “core curriculum must build a bridge from standards to achievement”.

The Albert Shanker Institute is led, in part, by Linda Darling Hammond and Anthony Bryk, President of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Signatories include several CES educators and power players in the creation of Common Core, such as Achieve, Inc. Founding Chairman Louis Gerstner, former Achieve, Inc. President Robert Schwartz, and Carnegie’s Marc Tucker.

In other words, the great and powerful Carnegie is already calling for common content. It’s just a matter of time.

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Discovery Education Brings Anti-American Curriculum to the Classroom


By Danette Clark

Discovery Education, the education division of Discovery Channel and Discovery Communications, currently provides curriculum resources to more than 1 million educators serving more than 35 million students.

Ironically, Discovery Education claims to provide “non-fiction”, “high quality content” to educators and students, when in fact, what they offer is a generous supply of superficial and extremely biased material fabricated by radicals.

For example, Discovery provides lessons to Kindergarten through 5th grade students on white privilege (a favored topic among progressives). The lesson recommends, as resources, two very radical organizations, Rethinking Schools and Southern Poverty Law Center.

In 2012, Tucson Unified School District’s Mexican-American Studies program was terminated after it was determined that curriculum material, among other violations of state law, promoted racism and the overthrow of the United States government.

Several books used as supporting curriculum material were subsequently removed from Tucson classrooms because they were found to be extremely hostile toward whites and depicted white people and America, in general, as racist and oppressive. One of the books removed was Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years by Rethinking Schools.

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Read about Rethinking Schools’ social justice math curriculum here.

Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) (also recommended by Discovery Education’s white privilege lesson) praises and promotes the work of communist educator Bill Ayers while labeling the Christian organization, Family Research Council, as a hate group because of its opposition to same-sex marriage.

Another Discovery lesson, created by AGC/United Learning, offers a melodramatic revisionist history of Christopher Columbus so overinflated that it is literally laughable. The lesson proclaims, that “because of the explorations of just one man named Christopher Columbus…”, native Americans lost both their land and their lives to their new European rulers and millions of Africans were brought to the New World to be slaves.

Discovery Education works with the Council of Chief State School Officers in the areas of professional development and assessments, and much of its digital content was specifically created to align with the Common Core State Standards.

Louisiana High School Recommends Porn to Students for Summer Reading Assignment


By Danette  Clark

Judging from the content of several texts recommended by the Common Core State Standards, it seems apparent that both the creators of the standards and the U.S. Department of Education (by way of its continued endorsement and funding of the standards) consider sex, profanity, and violence to be somehow beneficial to the education of children.

Thanks to a few attentive parents, we know that at least two Common Core Text Exemplars, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and Dreaming in Cuban by Christina Garcia, contain pornography and vulgar language.

For details on these books, go here and here.

Dutchtown High School in the Ascension Parish School District of Louisiana  recommended both The Bluest Eye and Dreaming in Cuban to students in 2012 as part of a required summer reading assignment. In addition to these two books, several others on the school’s summer reading list contain sexually explicit material, sexual themes, graphic violence, and profanity. Some of them recommended reading, some required.

CommonCoreAscensionParishDutchtownSummerReading2012

As shown in the screen shot above, 11th grade English III AP students were required to read Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. This book was previously banned for offensive language and sexually explicit content.

Another required text from the Dutchtown High School list is Thomas C. Foster’s How to Read Literature Like a Professor.  Sounds harmless enough (and boring), right? Hardly.

In this book, Foster jumps immediately into race baiting his readers, in the Introduction no less, by comparing white people to the devil.

Many pages, including a chapter titled It’s All About Sex, are dedicated to “finding the sexual component in literature”. Readers are taught to look for sex in everything — such as identifying lances, swords, guns and keys as phallic symbols and chalices, grails and bowls as symbols of female sexual organs.

Unfortunately, CCSSO and the Obama administration have cunningly managed to evade accountability for The Bluest Eye and Dreaming in Cuban by way of liability waivers and by labeling these trash texts as ‘recommended’ and the standards as ‘voluntary’ and ‘state-led’.

States and districts, however, can and should be made accountable for this obvious attack on our children and on parental authority.

As explained here, at the heart of the Common Core State Standards is a political and social agenda. These standards are a means to further infiltrate and then take over schools for the purpose of indoctrinating and controlling our children, a vital step in an attempt to decimate the social and moral fabric of our country.

Ascension Parish has long been a politically conservative district boasting some of the highest performing schools in the State of Louisiana. The district recently ranked 7th out of 70 in the state. Today, however, it appears to be the district most enthusiastic to embrace the morally corrupt agenda of the Common Core State Standards.

Read more about Common Core in Louisiana and Ascension Parish here.

Pearson’s Creepy Vision For the Future of Education Confirms Common Core Fears


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By Danette Clark

Pearson Education, an official partner in the development of resources and tests for the Common Core State Standards, released a video series last week to share their ‘vision for the future of learning’.

Although the technology shown by Pearson is impressive, these videos confirm the fears of many teachers about what will be expected of them and many parents regarding intrusive data mining of their children’s personal information.

In these videos, educators’ teaching styles are monitored by real-time cameras in every classroom and evaluated on the use of specific points of instruction. It goes without saying that dictating specific teaching strategies makes for big problems, especially if those strategies are used for indoctrination purposes. Just look to Texas for testimony of teachers that say they were reprimanded and threatened with dismissal if they failed to teach in the exact manner directed by CSCOPE.

Pearson also confirms (again) Common Core’s global agenda as students are shown participating in ‘global learning’ activities much like the Model United Nations program I wrote about here (which Pearson actively supports).

This vision of the future also entails teachers and school administrators having instant access to an individualized schedule on each student — not just an in-school/class schedule, but a schedule of the student’s activities and whereabouts outside of school.

In the video, Victoria’s Story: School of Thought–A Vision for the Future of Learning, Pearson demonstrates ease of access to students’ personal lives by showing a teacher instantaneously pulling Victoria’s schedule and sharing with another teacher that Victoria has soccer practice after school that time of year.

While it’s not clear from the video whether Victoria’s soccer practice is a school activity or part of an athletic organization not affiliated with the school, Pearson has shown that they believe educators should have knowledge of all extra-curricular activities students participate in.

For example, Pearson documents like this one (Creating a Classroom Environment That Promotes Positive Behavior) discuss the importance of evaluating data on a student’s after-school activities and other factors of the child’s life at home and in the community.

While this may be necessary for  students with severe behavior problems or a criminal record, the student with the ‘behavior problem’ referred to in Creating a Classroom Environment That Promotes Positive Behavior is a child who simply cannot keep still and talks out of turn.

Although Pearson apparently believes the more information the better, many parents would rightfully view this as a threat to their children’s privacy and safety, especially considering that student data is now being shared and sold all over the country.

FERPA laws that were put in place long ago to protect the privacy of student information were recently revised by the Obama administration to allow access to student data by third parties without parental consent.

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics provides a data model (the National Education Data Model (NEDM)) listing hundreds of very specific individual data points of information on children that they believe “all education stakeholders” need for “effective instruction of students and superior leadership of schools”.

The list of data points currently includes bus stop times, bus stop description, nickname, letters of commendation from any employer or community organization, any medals/awards for athletic or academic achievement, place of residence after the student graduates or withdraws from school, and a detailed reason for absences (family activities or vacation, family emergency, religious observance, etc.).

Data points that were recently scrubbed from the National Education Data Model due to public outcry over their level of intrusiveness included blood type, eye and hair color, birth marks, and whether or not the student was born premature.

The National Education Data Model was created through a partnership between the U.S. Department of Education (as funder) and the Common Core State Standards’ very-own Council of Chief State School Officers (as coordinator).

According to Pearson, the School of Thought videos present “a vision of the future that integrates technology, neuroscience, and educational psychology into everyday life to make anytime, anywhere learning possible”.

Take notice of those words — ‘neuroscience’ and ‘psychology’.

The narrator of Victoria’s Story, Pearson’s own Jeff Borden, eerily appears around the corner to Victoria’s bedroom in the video and explains that students’ learning styles and needs will be constantly analyzed so educators will know “the time of day, part of the week, and the season of the year when each student is most productive”.

So what kind of neuroscience and educational psychology is Pearson referring to for use in the constant analyzing of student learning and to know the time of day a student is most productive?

The Department of Education document, Promoting Grit, Tenacity, and Perseverance: Critical Factors for Success in the 21st Century, recommends evaluating students’ emotions, anxiety levels, and physiological traits using neuroscience devices like computers or tablets that record facial expression. Other devices recommended will monitor students’ brain wave patterns, skin conductance, heart rate variability, posture, and eye movement.

Get ready tax payers — if Common Core isn’t stopped, you will foot the bill for highly advanced devices that will be used to spy on America’s children 24 hours a day.

Utah K-12 Curriculum Material and Teacher Training Provided by Progressive Annenberg Foundation


“Enculturating the Young into a Social and Political Democracy”
Office of Alpine School District, Utah

By Danette Clark

There are some states that seem to have just completely thrown it all away.

It’s not surprising to find a liberal school on every corner in parts of California, Illinois, and New York; but what are Arkansas, Colorado, and Utah doing? Are the people in charge of education in these states just not paying attention, or are they closet progressives who know exactly what they’re doing?

Do our tax dollars not pay for someone to review lessons before they are approved for use in the classroom, or are our education leaders just that ignorant about the history of our country?

Whether ignorant or maniacal, these people have got to go. If conservative legislators in these states don’t get busy pursuing the truth and making the hard decisions that need to be made to reverse course, then they need to go as well.

As far back as 1999, the Coalition of Essential Schools began working in the State of Utah. The Utah Principals Academy trained 43 principals from 17 school districts on “the ten common principles” of CES schools.

CES is the progressive education reform movement behind both CSCOPE in Texas and the nationally proposed Common Core State Standards that President Obama is enticing every state to adopt.

Today, the Utah State Office of Education is in partnership with Utah Education Network (UEN) to provide professional development, lesson plans and curriculum resource material.

UEN’s website reveals that its professional development workshops and UEN-TV course materials are provided by the Annenberg Foundation and Annenberg Media. Curriculum resource material and lesson plans are provided by Annenberg Media and Annenberg learner.org.

Annenberg is the money, ‘political weight‘, and power force behind the Coalition of Essential Schools.

Annenberg’s learner.org provides pro-communist history lessons like those found in CSCOPE and the ones I wrote about in Discovery Channel Communications Company Partners with Radical Progressives to Bring Anti-American Curriculum to the Classroom and ‘Was George Washington Any Different From Palestinian Terrorists…?’.

In addition to the dangerous alliance with Annenberg through UEN, Utah State Office of Education partners with WestEd, Learning Forward, and ASCD in the  development of Utah measurement tools and the implementation of Common Core. All three organizations partner with the Coalition of Essential Schools to advance the radical CES school reform model.

Learning Forward (formerly named National Staff Development Council) recently teamed up with Linda Darling Hammond, one of several radical educators behind CSCOPE and Common Core, on a multi-year study titled, The Status of Professional Development in the United States.

WestEd’s work includes 10 ‘Equity Assistance Centers‘, all funded by the U.S. Department of Education, to provide “assistance and training in the areas of civil rights, equity, and school reform”.

The National Equity Project (formerly BayCES), a regional affiliate of the Coalition of Essential Schools, has partnered with WestEd on several  initiatives.  Linda Darling Hammond is an advisory board member to the National Equity Project.

It appears that parents in Utah, like many other states, are in for quite a battle in their fight against Common Core. Not only has Utah signed onto Common Core and, to date, shows no sign of turning back, the governors office and DOE even participated in the creation of the college and career readiness standards issued by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors Association (NGA) (leaders in the creation of Common Core).

This Utah Department of Education document from 2009 boasts of the State’s involvement with CCSSO and NGA:

“Staff members of both the Governor’s office and the USOE were involved in the development, providing input, direction and feedback.”

“Members of our Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) partners also served on design committees.”

Please go to whatiscommoncore.wordpress.com and utahnsagainstcommoncore.com and do what you can to support their efforts.

We have to believe it can be done, even if it means completely cleaning house. We only have a year-and-a-half until mid-term elections!

For more on Utah, go here and here to read some of the shocking things currently taking place in their schools.

CSCOPE Curriculum Designer Employed by CCSSO Partner to Aid in Implementing Common Core


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By Danette Clark

An update and correction to this post can be found below.

Grant Wiggins, one of eight designers of curriculum, standards and instruction of the pro-communist Texas CSCOPE curriculum, also provides professional development to aid educators in implementing the national Common Core State Standards.

Pearson, the education service company widely known for publishing textbooks, has partnered with the Council of Chief State School Officers in providing training and other resources to states implementing Common Core.

Through the ‘Pearson Common Core Institute’, Wiggins provides instruction via several Pearson Common Core webinar videos.

In one such webinar, Wiggins discusses “how issues of backward transfer relate to the Common Core”.

‘Backward transfer’ (also commonly referred to as ‘backward design’ or  ‘planning backwards’) is part of the Understanding by Design® framework for curriculum, assessment, and learning created by Wiggins and co-author, Jay McTighe, also a designer of CSCOPE.

As explained here and here, the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is the Bill Ayers backed progressive education reform movement behind both CSCOPE and Common Core. Linda Darling Hammond, developer of both CSCOPE and Common Core, has worked to implement CES reform for many years.

Grant Wiggins has worked with the Coalition of Essential Schools for many years, studying CES method and pedagogy, and incorporating them into the creation of his own curriculum and instruction design for use in CES schools.

A staple of the CES reform model has long been the use of ‘essential questions’ in identifying desired results of teacher instruction. Stage one of Wiggins and McTighe’s backward design process is identifying essential questions.

In 2011 and 2012, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) partnered with ASCD (the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) to hold statewide summits in several states on the implementation of Common Core.

Wiggins and McTighe’s Understanding by Design® was originally published by ASCD. Read about Texas ASCD’s involvement with the Coalition of Essential Schools and CSCOPE here and here.

Also, read more about Wiggins and others behind the Coalition of Essential Schools at Name Names — The People Behind the Largest Progressive Indoctrination Movement in the U.S.

Update / Correction — CSCOPE Curriculum Designer Employed by CCSSO Partner to Aid in Implementing Common Core.

In response to a couple of inquiries and comments as to whether Grant Wiggins is actually a ‘designer’ of CSCOPE, I decided to look further into Wiggins’ involvement to be certain that I’m not misleading or providing false information.

Although the link I provided in the original post names Wiggins and several others under the title “Beginning and Background of CSCOPE”, it does also say “Research Base” directly above the list of ‘designer’ and ‘developer’ names.

Someone pointed out that they believe this means the CSCOPE development team, after researching ‘best practice’ designs and strategies, chose to use those of Wiggins, McTighe, and others listed in the linked document, for the creation of CSCOPE — not that Wiggins directly contributed to CSCOPE by writing curriculum or designing lesson plans.

That makes perfect sense, and I admit that the document I chose to link to doesn’t effectively back up my claim that Wiggins is ‘one of eight designers… of CSCOPE’.

However, in light of information evidencing Wiggins’ involvement in professional development training for Texas educators both before and after CSCOPE was implemented, coupled with the fact that Wiggins and McTighe’s Understanding by Design® framework for curriculum, assessment, and learning was directly incorporated into the design of CSCOPE, I think it would be safe to say that Wiggins had a hand in the design of CSCOPE, and further add that it appears he had a hand in its implementation as well.

With over 1,600 lesson plans at any given time (some conveniently disappearing) and rumors of plagiarism, who can say for certain whose lesson plans or content is being provided through CSCOPE?

If CSCOPE was created using Wiggins’ design framework and he provides professional development to Texas educators that use his design framework, why would it be out of the question for CSCOPE to contain lesson plans created by Wiggins?

The sample lesson below uses ‘questions as curriculum’ and was created by Wiggins and McTighe. Compare this to the CSCOPE lesson that referred to the Boston Tea Party as an act of terrorism.

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This lesson plan looks like something that could have been used to teach students at Flour Bluff Intermediate School in Texas that the U.S. may have been a target for terrorism on 9/11 because we hurt other countries by making bad decisions.

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More ‘essential questions‘ from Wiggins and McTighe:

• Was George Washington any different from Palestinian terrorists trying to protect their country?

• Was Jefferson a hypocrite? Did he really think of a slave as a sub-human while writing the Declaration of Independence?

Here’s an essential question — With Wiggins acting on behalf of the CCSSO and Pearson to aid educators in implementing Common Core, how can we not expect lessons like these to become the national standard?